Methods for Change Phase 2

Aspect member: University of Manchester. 

What is the project doing? 

Methods for Change Phase 2 draws on the existing collaborators from Phase 1, and the wider and expanded Aspect network partners. 

The project’s first monitoring and evaluation survey conducted in summer of 2021 has shown that for 85% of people being involved with Methods for Change Phase 1 (Aspect contributors, academic and non-academic stakeholders) has ‘prompted them to think differently about their work and the role of social science methods’. Phase 2 looks set to continue the ambitious aim of realising the value of social science methodologies for creating change in society, and continue highlighting their importance, relevance and potential use beyond academic contexts for non-academic stakeholders from business, industry, government, and third sector organisations.

In this iteration, the project hopes to engage more strongly with critical and interpretive approaches to spatial, mixed methods, and quantitative methodologies. It will also more strongly engage with academics who are using social science research methods within interdisciplinary settings. Building on the success of Phase 1, the project will also look to explore non-traditional funding for social science methods driven projects (e.g., Innovate UK KPTs) and cooperative, social science consultancy projects across University of Manchester and other academic partners building partnerships, collaboration and non-academic impacts that will live beyond Phase 2 of the project. 

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Why is this needed? 

The social sciences offer many possibilities to deepening understandings of societal needs, environmental challenges, and wider political dynamics that can enhance the practices of customer, consumer and policy research within businesses, third sector organisations and government departments. The robust methodologies developed within the social sciences are often under-utilised by non-academic sectors and in interdisciplinary settings. Given the complexities of current national and global socio-ecological and socio-economic problems, there has never been a more important moment to mobilise the potential within social science methodologies with non-academic stakeholders to invoke transformative socio-ecological and political change.

How can members get involved? 

The project will take place for 15 months from June 2022.

For further information on how to be involved please contact Dr Ali Browne (alison.browne@manchester.ac.uk).

Resources

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64 resources | Page 1 of 4

28 January 2024

Should we spend more time talking about methods?

This blog by the Methods for Change team, illustrated by Jack Brougham, asks if we should spend more time talking about the methods we use as researchers. Drawing on a recent paper, we suggest that researchers need to articulate why methods matter in creating change to global challenges. We share three creative techniques that we have experimented with across the Methods for Change project that can encourage playful, reflective conversation about methods and their role in galvanising change.

18 January 2024

Collaborative Zine Making Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Collaborative Zine Making Method used by Professor Sarah Marie Hall from the University of Manchester and developed in collaboration with Inspire Women Oldham. The zine was also created in collaboration with Inspire Women Oldham.

18 January 2024

Oral Histories of Sensory Memories

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Oral Histories of Sensory Memories method used by Associate Professor Roisin Higgins from Maynooth University, Republic of Ireland. The poster was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustrations.

18 January 2024

Pop-up Stall Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Pop-up Stall method used by Dr Robert Meckin and Dr Andrew Balmer from the University of Manchester. The poster was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustrations.

18 January 2024

Diffractive Genealogy Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Diffractive Genealogy method used by Professor Natasha Mauthner from the University of Newcastle. The poster was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustrations

18 January 2024

Facet Methodology

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Facet Methodology approach used by Magdalena Rodekirchen, research associate at the University of Manchester. The video was created in collaboration with Tom Young.

18 January 2024

Method Stacking

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Method Stacking approach used by Dr Kat Thiel from Manchester Metropolitan University and Dr Iveta Eimontaite of Cranfield University. The poster was created in collaboration with Jack Brougham.

18 January 2024

Participatory GIS Mapping Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Participatory GIS mapping methods used by Dr Jonathan Huck from the University of Manchester. The poster was created in collaboration with Jack Brougham.

18 January 2024

Thinking Through Comics Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Thinking Through Comics method used by Professor Eric Laurier and Dr Shari Sabeti from the University of Edinburgh. The comic strip was created in collaboration with Jack Brougham.

19 September 2023

Remote Ethnography: Mobile Phone Methods

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Remote Ethnography method used by Dr Alison Briggs from the University of Manchester. The animated GIF was created in collaboration with Caroline Boyd of Boy Oh Boy! Designs

30 August 2023

Collage as Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Collage method used by Dr Amy Barron from the University of Manchester. The artwork was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustration.

28 July 2023

Making Textiles together

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Making Textiles Together method used by Dr Amy Twigger-Holroyd from Nottingham Trent University, and Dr Emma Shercliff from Arts University Bournemouth. The artwork was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustration.

12 July 2023

Multi-method mapping

This ‘How To’ Guide outlines the Multi-method Mapping method used by Heather Miles for The University of Manchester. The animated GIF was created in collaboration with Caroline Boyd, Boy Oh Boy Designs.

12 July 2023

Militant Research

This ‘How To’ Guide outlines the Militant Research method used by Dr Jess Adams for Newcastle University. The video was created in collaboration with Aude Aboul-Nasr.

30 May 2023

Research Method: Designs for Addressing Racial inEqualities (DARE)

This ‘how to’ guide outlines the Designs for Addressing Racial inEqualities (DARE) research method used by Dr Temidayo Eseonu from Lancaster University. The artwork was created in collaboration with Caroline Boyd, Boy Oh Boy Designs.

30 May 2023

Research Method: Critical Spatial Data Science

This ‘how to’ guide outlines the Critical Spatial Data Science research method used by Dr Caitlin Robinson from the University of Bristol. The artwork was created in collaboration with Jack Brougham.

Research Method: Constructivist Grounded Theory

30 May 2023

Research Method: Constructivist Grounded Theory

This ‘how to’ guide outlines the Constructivist Grounded Theory research method used by Dr Denise Miller from the University of Greenwich. The artwork was created in collaboration with Chris Murray, More than Minutes.

2 March 2023

Methods for Change at the ESRC Festival of Social Sciences 2022

In this blog the Methods for Change team reflect on two interactive sessions on spatial, qualitative, and mixed methods convened as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science 2022.

3 January 2023

An introduction to Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (Innovate UK)

The Methods for Change (M4C) team delivered a session organised by Dr Temidayo Eseonu on Innovate UK funding, in particular, Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs) that link businesses, academics, and inspiring graduates and post-graduates.

7 November 2022

Event: Methods for Change – Social science methodologies for 21st century problems

Join the Methods for Change Team two interactive events on a diversity of social science methods for understanding and addressing 21st century challenges!

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