Event: Methods for Change – Social science methodologies for 21st century problems

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7th November 2022

Funded Project:
Methods for Change Phase 2

Wednesday 9 November

Have you ever wondered how research can be useful beyond academia? Are you interested in knowing more about different ways to understand a particular issue or tackle a problem?

The Methods for Change team is excited to invite anyone with an interest in creative, participatory, spatial, and mixed methods in social science research to our two Festival of Social Science events! The events are open to the public, students, academics, anyone working in business, public, third and policy sectors who would like to find out more.

For more details and to register follow this link


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Should we spend more time talking about methods?

This blog by the Methods for Change team, illustrated by Jack Brougham, asks if we should spend more time talking about the methods we use as researchers. Drawing on a recent paper, we suggest that researchers need to articulate why methods matter in creating change to global challenges. We share three creative techniques that we have experimented with across the Methods for Change project that can encourage playful, reflective conversation about methods and their role in galvanising change.

Collaborative Zine Making Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Collaborative Zine Making Method used by Professor Sarah Marie Hall from the University of Manchester and developed in collaboration with Inspire Women Oldham. The zine was also created in collaboration with Inspire Women Oldham.

Oral Histories of Sensory Memories

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Oral Histories of Sensory Memories method used by Associate Professor Roisin Higgins from Maynooth University, Republic of Ireland. The poster was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustrations.

Pop-up Stall Method

This ‘How-To’ Guide outlines the Pop-up Stall method used by Dr Robert Meckin and Dr Andrew Balmer from the University of Manchester. The poster was created in collaboration with Maddy Vian, Maddy Vian Illustrations.